YA Review: Let’s Talk About Love by Claire Kann

TitleLet’s Talk About Love by Claire Kann

Rating: 4.5/5

Two-sentence summary: Being true to herself is difficult for Alice when her girlfriend leaves her after coming out as asexual. But when she meets “library worker in shining armor” Takumi over the summer, can she risk falling in love again if it means finally being understood?

Portrayal of LGBTQ issues: This book features a panromantic asexual woman who, after breaking up with her girlfriend, develops a “squish” (asexual crush) on a male coworker. I liked how well Alice explained a lot of asexual terminology (like asexuality vs romanticism) without feeling weighed down with jargon.

Let’s Talk About Love also features a queer POC protagonist written by an #OwnVoices author, which is always good to see in YA.

What I loved: What I enjoyed most about this book is how lovable the characters are, especially Alice! Whether she was squealing about cute animals or standing up to her lawyer parents to pursue her dream, I found her character really endearing. Plus, the way she explains the difference between aesthetic, romantic, and sexual attraction was so enlightening as a non-ace reader and I imagine it would feel relatable for those who are.

Plus, the romance between Alice and Takumi was equal parts sweet and realistic. Although they both feel genuine care for each other, Let’s Talk About Love doesn’t shy away from showing the challenges of relationships between ace and non-ace people. Alice struggles to come out to Takumi because she worries he’ll leave her. And even though being honest gives her relief, Takumi does have a hard time understanding what her asexuality means for their relationship. But there’s also plenty of adorable, fluffy moments between the two to balance out the more serious stuff.

The only complaint I had is that I feel like this book should be shelved as new adult, not YA, since Alice is a college student. Recently I’ve come across a lot of discussions on Twitter about how when we write adult protagonists in YA, we’re isolating the target teen audience. It’s important to put books with adult protagonists in the right category to make sure YA reaches the readers who need it most. Plus, new adult is such a fledgling category and could use more well-written novels.

Quote: “You can’t let one or two bad experiences stop you from being happy.”

Recommended: If you’re looking for a sweet coming of age romance with plenty of queer representation, this book is a great choice! Also, on a side note, I just realizes that both of the books I’ve read about asexuality (this and Tash Hearts Tolstoy) have a female protagonist. Let me know if you’ve heard of any books with an asexual male or non binary protagonist! I think those perspectives would be both fascinating and important to see in YA.

Queer YA Review: Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee

 

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Title: Tash Hearts Tolstoy

Author: Kathryn Ormsbee

Rating: 4/5

Two-sentence summary: When Tash Zelenka’s “Unhappy Families,” a modern webseries adaptation of Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, goes viral and is nominated for a Golden Tuba award, she becomes friends (and maybe something more) with fellow Tuba nominee Thom Causer. But how can she explain to her budding crush—or anyone else—that she’s asexual?

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Portrayal of LGBTQ issues: This book features a heteroromantic asexual protagonist. Asexuality is something I still have a lot to learn about, but just for others who might not know the difference between asexuality and aromanticism: asexuality is the lack of sexual attraction to others, and aromanticism is the lack of romantic attraction. Because I’m not asexual, I don’t know if I can comment on whether it’s an accurate portrayal but have seen generally positive reviews from the ace community. There is also a queer male relationship, but it’s not the main focus of the novel.

What I loved: Every character in Tash Hearts Tolstoy felt vibrant and alive, even minor characters that don’t get more than a few scenes in the novel. You can’t always say that, especially since too much backstory can sometimes weigh down a novel, but it really gave this one depth. It felt like dipping into someone’s memories of the summer before their senior year rather than just a simple YA romance. In terms of the romantic plot itself, that, too, was more complex than I thought it would be—a happy surprise. I didn’t expect the characters’ reactions to Tash’s identity, nor their internalized emotions, to happen as they did. Without spoiling the story, the romantic heart of the story doesn’t turn out as you think it will but still ends in a satisfying way.

And while I don’t identify as asexual, I have seen several reviews from ace readers that said reading this book was like stepping into light after a long time in the dark. It was also useful on a personal level because it helped me understand more about ace identities and complexities that happen when a romantic asexual person goes into a relationship with a non-ace person. Whether you’re familiar with the ace community or not, it’s an insightful and comprehensive portrayal without weighing the text down with paragraphs of explanations.

Quote: “If you want a chance at being happy, exist. Because yes, life can suck, but as long as you’re alive, there’s a chance you can be happy.”

Recommended: This was such a delightful story! I’d recommend it to anyone who wants a cute, quirky novel with plenty of diverse queer identities. And, of course, if you’re a fan of literary webseries like The Lizzie Bennett Diaries or (my personal favorite) Edgar Allan Poe’s Murder Mystery Invite Only Casual Dinner Party / Gala For Friends Potluck, this also explores the “other side” of producing one—dealing with melodramatic actors, reacting to negative reviews, and managing a sudden tsunami wave of fame. It’s so wholesome, guys!